Morgan Redeux – The Morgan-NJ.org Web Site!

Painting of the Morgan Section of Sayreville by H & H Wiley Courtesy of the Sayreville Historical Society.

Painting of the Morgan Section of Sayreville by H & H Wiley Courtesy of the Sayreville Historical Society.

Find the new stuff by clicking on RECENT ADDITIONS, above.

Morgan, New Jersey is not really a city or a town but rather a political subsection of the Borough of Sayreville and named for the family which purchased the property just a little over 300 years ago.  It is located on the western shores of Raritan Bay, bordered to the north by the City of South Amboy and by Cheesequake Creek to the south.  The western border seems to be not quite well defined though it is, I’m told, generally understood to be somewhere around the present day Garden State Parkway.

The original “Five Hundred acres of Land & marsh” was purchased by Charles Morgan III on May 7, 1710 and appears to have remained in the family for some 200 years.  Now a long established bedroom community, it was once a sparsely populated wooded area and even before that time, was presumably the home to the Lenni Lenape tribe.  Since then, Morgan gained a railroad, which is still very much in use, a state highway also very much in use.  For a few decades, there was a trolley line.  For some fifty years, there was a thriving beach community which was the first stop in New Jersey’s fabled “Jersey Shore.” There were markers showing the border between New York and New Jersey. For a few hundred years there was a historic inn with the legend of the hanging of a spy. Within an eleven month time period, there was the expedited building of one of the largest munitions plants of its time, or ever, and its deadly sudden and total destruction.  The bluff overlooking the bay was used during the Revolution as a way to monitor enemy ship movements. One member of the Morgan family was killed during the revolution and is buried next to his father and brother all of whom were part of the Middlesex County Militia – the brother also later being a member of the US Congress House of Representatives. There is one school, two cemeteries, no places of worship I can think of, a brick road, a few marinas – even after Hurricane Sandy, a channel with two jetties, two road bridges and one railroad bridge over Cheesequake Creek, a gas pipeline leading under the bay, a number of small businesses but mostly houses and the remains of “The Woods.”  If Facebook and the initial response to this web site are guides, Morgan is also very fondly thought of by the many people who either grew up there or spent a good portion of their lives there.

To view a topic, click on any of the topics to the right of the HOME button at the top of this page.

If you are revisiting, check out the new stuff by clicking on RECENT ADDITIONS to the right of the HOME button at the top of this page.

22 thoughts on “Morgan Redeux – The Morgan-NJ.org Web Site!

  1. Darrell Larsen

    Thank you for your hard work on this web site. I enjoy the articles and information you provide. I grew up in Morgan not knowing much of the history unfortunately the schools tought us nothing about our own great town.

    Thank you
    Darrell

    Reply
  2. Jim Maciejewski

    Hello Verne! I, Jim Maciejewski, had posted a modern day map used by the Sayreville Auxilary PD on Morgan’s fb group page about 2 years or so ago. It shows the GSP, Garden State Parkway, as being the borderline and not Rt 35. There’s a few streets that run off the main road, Gondek Dr, that is used to get to the docks/boatyards off the Cheesequake Creek off Ernston Rd today. Plus there’s a small development off Rt 35 on St Peter Dr, near a jughandle off Rt 35 near the South Amboy boderline, that runs out to the GSP. Good to see the site up and running again. It’s a great learning tool and very interesting. Thanks for all you do, Jim Maciejewski.

    Reply
  3. Sherry Bailey

    Love this site. I grew up at the Robert E. Lee (1960 – 1973). Would love to see someone develope the property that the Robert E. Lee was.

    Reply
  4. David Caruso

    Great website. Very informative about the neighborhood that I spent a good portion of my youth. Had no idea there was such historical significance there.

    One incident I remember somewhat clearly is an event that occurred in the summer of 1997. While the movie “Star Wars” was released that summer, some sort of freight train was broken into on the NJT railroad tracks in Morgan just steps from the now defunct dirt cliff “Suey.” The freight car contained an overabundance of “Star Wars” action figures that were promptly taken and the entire area surrounding the tracks was littered with opened and discarded Star Wars’ action figure packages. I was only 6, but remember this quite vividly…mostly because I got there too late.

    Anyone else remember that event?

    Reply
    1. Dave Caruso

      Correction. The summer of the great Star Wars action figure caper was the summer of 1977, not 1997…sorry for the type-o.

      Also, what is now Parker Court, which showcases luxury homes that were constructed in the late 1980s, is where “Suey” once was…and not too far from the cliff was what appeared to be a semi-constructed rail bridge. Anyone familiar with that and story behind it?

      Reply
  5. Linda Frankel [Moskal]

    Was trying to connect with a group called you know you`re from Morgan if…was uunable to do so but I came upon this site instead. I grew up in Morgan and really enjoyed reaading the historical background. I remember being told as a child the that one member of the Morgan family was Morgan the Pirate and he docked his ship on Morgan Beach. Obviously not true! I was a very gullible child! Thank you for providing me with more accuratte information.

    Reply
      1. Brian Burlew

        The metal bridge was known by us as the three stones…. The hills were big suey, little suey, transco, maniac, big tit and a few others what good memories.

        Reply
  6. Vernie (Muth) Jarocki

    Verne. we have similar first names and a love and sense of awe for our childhood home. I am so happy that I found your blog. Both my husband Bill and I grew up in Morgan and enjoy your extensive research on the history of our small charming town.

    Reply
  7. Sue Meyer

    Verne,
    In bed and bored. Reviewing south amboy citizen to pass the time.

    Check out Jan 25th and Feb 1. This was right after Gillespie exploded. They apparently gave one of their remaining buildings to the YMCA and “Camp Morgan” was opened. A “canteen” providing for, entertainment, etc. for the soldiers.

    Ever heard of this? Any idea where the building was?

    Hope you are well.
    Sue Meyer

    Reply
  8. Robert Chevalier Busch

    In 1919 or 1920 after the Gillespie explosion there was a public sale of the remaining building at the sight. My uncle, Fred Dietrich went to the sale and purchased a buildilng with 2 rooms. He built a trailer, loaded the building on it, and moved it to Church Street in Matawan Twp ( which is now Aberdeen Twp) and attached it to the rear of existing house. This house with the attached building from Gillespie is still in use. This property was originally purchasd by my Grandparents in 1892 and I still use it.

    Reply
    1. morgannjadmin Post author

      Very cool!! What was the building made out of? I’m guessing if your uncle was able to transport it in 1919/1920 that it would not have been a brick building.

      Reply
  9. Susan

    Does anyone remember the gas leak explosion that leveled many of the homes behind the Club Bene? Was that land ever redeveloped? I moved from Morgan to Maryland in 1988 and have been back but never went back there to see.

    Reply
  10. MICKEY BARBA

    I consumed too much beer gazing at a wonderful view of South Amboy Waterworks at a long gone place we all called “40 HORSES”.Smoked all the bones I could smoke next to the baseball fields and JESSE SELOVER SCHOOL.(they throw ya in jail for doin’ that sorta thing these days).Many of those folks from then are dead and gone,but I have my memories…

    Reply

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